Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum

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-   -   Anti-gel (https://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/3rd-gen-non-powertrain/2509025-anti-gel.html)

Adrien34 08-20-2019 01:45 AM

I'm not new to the diesel world, however I'm new to it in an area that gets 20-30 below, with no problem. I've done some research and found that there are a million different additives that all claim to be the best. From what you guys have used, what is the best option, in your opinion, for anti-gel additives to keep your fuel flowing?

Jimmy N. 08-20-2019 11:08 AM

I've had good luck with Howes and Power Service.

MDSWA 08-20-2019 11:24 AM

I use Power Service Diesel Kleen. Gray bottle in the summer, white bottle in winter and a spare bottle of PS 911 in the truck for emergencies. I've also used Optilube but it's a bit more expensive.

Millertime21 08-20-2019 11:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MDSWA (Post 29065119)
I use Power Service Diesel Kleen. Gray bottle in the summer, white bottle in winter and a spare bottle of PS 911 in the truck for emergencies. I've also used Optilube but it's a bit more expensive.

Same here. Coldest day last winter was -25f and the truck started with ease.

Grit dog 08-20-2019 07:50 PM

You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Once in Denver, all the diesels gelled up about 10 years ago. Got a -30 cold snap and it was later determined that the local fuel was only being treated to -10F. I was working in Denver, all our equipment gelled up. Not a bottle of 911 to be had by 8am, trucks scattered on the sides of the roads everywhere. I drove up into the mountains and bought a couple cases of 911 for the job. Probably could have made some bank driving around town selling it for $50 a bottle!

Other places to look out for are particularly low alt warm climates that are near mountains. IE you could buy fuel in Vegas and gel up in Utah because you could make it there in 1 tank of fuel. There's actually signs on I -15 going North out of Mesquite NV that they sell winter blend fuel. Last winter we were down in Vegas/Mesquite and then went up to Park City. 70 deg 1 day, -15 that night. I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.

STONR 08-20-2019 09:13 PM

I was working in Leadville CO a few years ago. I was filling up in Grand Junction (cheapest fuel on my drive), and making a round trip to Leadville and back to GJ for fuel for my drive back to Utah. I used Howes, mixed it just as the bottle recommends. Typically saw -20 to -30 at 11400' elevation.

I carried a little plastic measuring cup with me. I marked it with 10g, 20g, and 30g marks, so I could quickly measure out the additive based on my tank fill while at the pump.

Jimmy N. 08-20-2019 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grit dog (Post 29065631)
You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.

There are exceptions, but they're rare.I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.

I'm a prime example of being an exception. Not driving my 3500 all that often (it is a tow vehicle after all) and having 74 gallons on board, I frequently end up running summer fuel in the winter, and vice versa.

Adrien34 08-21-2019 01:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grit dog (Post 29065631)
You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.
Once in Denver, all the diesels gelled up about 10 years ago. Got a -30 cold snap and it was later determined that the local fuel was only being treated to -10F. I was working in Denver, all our equipment gelled up. Not a bottle of 911 to be had by 8am, trucks scattered on the sides of the roads everywhere. I drove up into the mountains and bought a couple cases of 911 for the job. Probably could have made some bank driving around town selling it for $50 a bottle!

Other places to look out for are particularly low alt warm climates that are near mountains. IE you could buy fuel in Vegas and gel up in Utah because you could make it there in 1 tank of fuel. There's actually signs on I -15 going North out of Mesquite NV that they sell winter blend fuel. Last winter we were down in Vegas/Mesquite and then went up to Park City. 70 deg 1 day, -15 that night. I ran anti gel because I still had some desert fuel in the truck when I filled up on the way up to SLC.

You're probably totally right. I never thought of that and I have no idea why lol. There's no way they are selling untreated diesel up here! It would gel up in their pumps.

Frozen6bt 08-21-2019 04:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grit dog (Post 29065631)
You don't need any anti-gel if you are buying fuel in the region where those temperatures are normal/expected. Winter fuel is treated for the area.
There are exceptions, but they're rare.

Don't be so sure there. I've seen plenty of #1 fuel gel before. My 3rd gen hasn't ever gelled on me but it was a regular fight with my 1st gen prior to the Piston lift pump conversion. Of course, I'm talking about temps of -45* and colder for weeks at a time.

I use Stanadyne performance formula and Walmart 2-stroke all winter long and rarely have issues. Power service in a pinch if I didn't pack my Stanadyne for a trip.

BR3500 08-21-2019 06:48 AM


Adrien34 08-21-2019 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BR3500 (Post 29066035)

Thanks!!! That's a pretty cool breakdown they did as to what does what and when to use it.

the man in black 08-21-2019 10:14 AM

Fuel can be hit or miss. How often the station fills their tanks. How well is it blended. Not all fuel is the same, they have different blends. I've been mid winter in a northern state and had fuel gel. Dont count on the fuel station to get it right.


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