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-   Alternative Fuels, Additives, Oils & Lubricants (http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/alternative-fuels-additives-oils-lubricants/)
-   -   Rotella 15w-40 junk? (http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/alternative-fuels-additives-oils-lubricants/222460-rotella-15w-40-junk.html)

Stefan73 12-19-2013 01:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eddielee (Post 8615674)
Here is an excerpt showing Dodge Specifications From the Maintenance Manual.
As long as the oil used conforms to the listed Specifications or superior specifications and It is used correctly There Should Be No Issues arise due to oil.

Ok well no image Hmm?

Guess I'll just type it...

In diesel engines, use an engine oil that conforms to API Service Grade CF-4 or CG-4/SH.

These are the type of specifications I posted in my first response.

SAE VISCOSITY
An SAE viscosity grade is used to specify the viscosity of an engine oil.
SAE 15W-40 specifies a multiple viscosity engine oil.
When choosing an engine oil, consider the range of temperatures the vehicle will be operated in before the next oil change.
Select an engine oil that is best suited to your areas particular ambient temperature range and variation. For diesel engines, Refer to (Fig.6).

Fig. 6 shows Temperature ranges from

-10 to 0 Degrees F to be
10W-30 W/ BLOCK HEATER AND,
3W-30 W/OUT BLOCK HEATER

0-30 degrees F to be 10W-30

10 Degrees F and up to be 15W-40

Where is the -60F range?

Stefan73 12-19-2013 01:54 AM

Great read (can't believe I read all this). My big issue is that I live in an extreme. Last winter (I live near North Pole), I was able to see below -50F (I just took the picture after I had the bright idea to take it).

bucket1911 12-19-2013 09:46 AM

Buddy thats cold, my joints hurt just looking at that

eddielee 12-19-2013 11:37 AM

Mix your own...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Stefan73 (Post 9014314)
Where is the -60F range?

Reality is that you can make your own grade set by mixing oil grades.
The definitions of viscosity and their ratings are pendant upon their flow at different temperatures. If I were you I would put like a half gallon of 0W-5 or so in with the -10 oil specification set. I am fond of creating my own blends based on the actual variations of temperatures you face.

For instance if you start the day in -10* and the temps increase to 45-50 during the day, as it does in New Mexico, I would put a gallon of 3W-30 and then a gallon of 10W-30 and a gallon of 15W-40.
doing such a thing gives protection at the coldest Temperatures as well as the most extreme.

Northern NM actually does see -50* temps and average winter temps are -5* 5 min after dark and dropping unless it is snowing.

so you need to do what you think is best for your conditions and no one will know what those are unless it is you!!

Snofarmer 12-19-2013 12:55 PM

^....????

When your engine is running be it in -60*f or in +100*F heat the 2nd number is what matters as this is the viscosity of the oil at operating temps.

The only time the first number comes into play is at starting with a cold engine, then the ambient temps play a role.

you can drive from Mexico to the interior of Alaska to -65*f temps and if you don't shut it off the vorticity of your oil will not change.

eddielee 12-19-2013 03:49 PM

^^ this would depend on the actual temperature of the engine, if your engine temp decreased due to the dropping temperature the viscosity would change with the drop in temperature requiring 30 W rather than 40 W or 45 W
And your statement is also why I did not recommend anything less than 0 W-30 due to the operating temperature needing a minimum of 30 W oil.
the 0w-5 was recommended at a half gallon because it would equal a quart of 0 W and a quart of 5W.
All the rest are specified by Dodge.

0W would burn at the higher temps but would provide protection at the -60 and -50 temps for start-up.

Yes you are right the higher viscosity is needed at operating temps and if you have a block heater that works and can be used the 0w would not be needed if the block was kept at a minimum of 0*

Snofarmer 12-19-2013 05:00 PM

At temps of 0*F and below their is no oil that is thin enough at start up.

Modern water cooled engines be they gas or diesel run at a optimal temp of 180-200*F no matter the outside ambient temp. be it 120*f or -60*F outside.
The engines thermostat opens at what temp? This maintains the engines temp regardless of the ambient temp.
This is why if you never shut it off you wouldn't need a multi grade oil and the oil you ran in Mexico would be just fine at the north pole.

Yes, in extreme cold a diesel will like a "cold front" or other measures, will help to maintain the proper engine temp so the thermostat will open occasionally.
Negating the perceived need to mix and match viscosity's.


Quote:

Originally Posted by eddielee (Post 9025522)
^^ this would depend on the actual temperature of the engine, if your engine temp decreased due to the dropping temperature the viscosity would change with the drop in temperature requiring 30 W rather than 40 W or 45 W
And your stat
0W would burn at the higher temps but would provide protection at the -60 and -50 temps for start-up.

Yes you are right the higher viscosity is needed at operating temps and if you have a block heater that works and can be used the 0w would not be needed if the block was kept at a minimum of 0*


Joe4d 12-19-2013 06:46 PM

Marine engineer, Worked with alot of cummins. All used Rotella 15/40.
KTA 50's , 855's, little 4.0L units on the tugs.
Samples every 100 hours or so, those tug generators usually run 20,000 hours before a rebuild, and thats just because, not necessarily because they need it.
Do the math and let me know what 20,000 hours running at 1800 rpm would equal in miles,

Stefan73 12-19-2013 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Snofarmer (Post 9026826)
At temps of 0*F and below their is no oil that is thin enough at start up.

Modern water cooled engines be they gas or diesel run at a optimal temp of 180-200*F no matter the outside ambient temp. be it 120*f or -60*F outside.
The engines thermostat opens at what temp? This maintains the engines temp regardless of the ambient temp.
This is why if you never shut it off you wouldn't need a multi grade oil and the oil you ran in Mexico would be just fine at the north pole.

Yes, in extreme cold a diesel will like a "cold front" or other measures, will help to maintain the proper engine temp so the thermostat will open occasionally.
Negating the perceived need to mix and match viscosity's.

If I never shut it off. Like most people my job is not the highest paying and I can not leave my truck running 24/7. To mitigate that I have it plugged in with dual oil pan heaters, block heater, tranny heater and battery heaters. My concern is when I go up to the north slope for Caribou and I have to leave the truck.

tubehead 12-21-2013 11:34 AM

Depending on gearing you should be running right at 60mph. So 60x20,000=1,200,000 miles.

Louis53123 12-21-2013 10:41 PM

I run rotella in my diesel cat marine engines with no problems. Its preference.

Stefan73 01-20-2014 04:59 PM

What about Mobil 1 5-40 Turbo Diesel Truck? From the site.
Mobil 1 Turbo Diesel Truck 5W-40
A fully synthetic motor oil, Mobil 1 Turbo Diesel Truck 5W-40 is engineered to help extend engine life in modern turbo-charged diesel engines, even those operating in severe conditions such as towing and hauling. For vehicles requiring an oil that meets the CJ-4 industry standard, please check the bottle labels when buying Mobil 1 Turbo Diesel Truck 5W-40 as inventory transitions to the new CJ-4 formulation.


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