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94-98 Engine Tech articles dealing with the 2nd gen 12V engine

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Old 12-10-2009, 09:01 PM   #1 (permalink)
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KDP damaged case repair instructions

I took some other instructions I found and added on to them from my experience replacing the timing housing. I figured they will help someone out whose had the KDP bite them as well. I'm sure I left somethings out so add your own tricks you've learned.

Killer Dowel Pin Repair

While doing this it a good idea to get some new parts and replace as you go along while you have the front of the truck apart anyway:
• Water pump
• Accessory belt
• Upper and lower radiator hoses if desired
• Vacuum/PS pump reseal kit (might as well if its been leaking a while)
• Front main bearing (just in case you damage the one in there)

Other things you’ll need:
• new timing case (Cummins)
• Timing case seal kit (Cummins or Napa)
• Front main seal (Cummins or Napa)
• New dowel pin (Cummins)
• Timing pin kit (Cummins)
• Lift pump gasket (Napa)
• Valve cover gaskets (Cummins or Napa)
• 12’ of ½” wood dowels (Hardware store)
• Coolant

Disassembly

• First drain all the coolant you can, removing the lower radiator hose is easiest
• Remove the bumper
• Remove the windshield washer fluid reservoir from the fan shroud (the coolant reservoir can stay on)
• Remove the accessory drive belt
• Remove the fan shroud and the fan assembly at the same time (the only way to do it). Taking off the top radiator hose as well makes this easier.
• Remove the front cross piece (what your hood attaches to when closed)
• Now remove the radiator (good idea to flush it while its out)
• Then remove the intercooler boots/pipes and then take the intercooler out
• It is possible to keep the A/C condenser connected without loosing your charge of Freon. Just be careful to not break/crack the lines as you bend it out of the way.
• Remove the harmonic balancer and RPM sensor (use a pneumatic air gun to keep the engine from rotating)
• Remove the engine oil fill tube by rotating it counter-clockwise.
• Now you can remove your timing cover
• Inspect the gears for any signs of damage the dowel pin may have caused
• Line up your timing gear marks by rotating the engine CLOCKWISE
• Remove vacuum pump and power steering pump (vacuum pump gear is not required to be removed)
• Mark IP shaft and gear for correct installation later. Remove injection pump nut, washer and gear. A puller is required to get the gear off.
• Remove the four bolts connecting the injection pump to the timing case. Don’t worry about it falling; it mounts to the block as well.
• The inner bottom bolt for the IP to the case is in a bad spot and will need some thinking to get to. A lot of swivels and extensions is probably the easiest.
• Remove valve covers
• Remove the windshield wipers and plastic cowl to reach the #5 and #6 cylinder push rods in next step.
• Remove rocker assemblies and pushrods, there are two grommets under where the plastic cowl/windshield wipers used to be that cover holes to allow the #5 and #6 cylinder pushrods to be removed.
• Insert a ½” dowel rod 12” long into the tappets on the camshaft. Cut a ½” - 1” slit into the end of the rod that will go down into the head/block to lift the tappet
• Drive dowel rods into tappets and pick them up off the camshaft, a good smack with a dead blow will seat them well. Pull up to check if you got a hold of one, if the rod comes back out you missed, if it stops a little way up that’s the tappet hitting the block and you’re good to go.
• Rubber band each dowel rod to the one opposite it to keep them in place.
• If a tappet falls off the dowel rod the oil pan must be removed to retrieve it, or you might get lucky fishing a magnet into the pan from the front of the engine.
• Unbolt the lift pump from the block, if you don’t the cam will get caught on the lift pump push rod. Also make sure you don’t loose the lift pump push rod in the oil pan.
• Remove the camshaft retainer plate
• Now remove the camshaft carefully, making sure not to score the bearing at the front of the motor, if positioned correctly it should slide out smoothly but that’s easier said than done.
• Now remove the timing gear housing from the block
• The four studs that hold the injection pump and the timing pin must be pressed from the old housing and put into the new housing.
• The timing pin on the backside of the timing housing (right above the hole for the vacuum/PS pump) has to be swapped over or a new one must be put in your timing housing.

Reassembly

• Clean all parts very well, use a lot of carb/brake cleaner or a solvent bin is nice to
• Place the timing housing to block gasket in place. Gasket-synch is good to have to make sure it won’t leak down the road. Silicone can also be used if desired.
• Put a dab of silicone at the bottom joint where the timing case, block and oil pan meet so you won’t develop an oil leak here
• Put new dowel pin into the hole the old one fell out of. And yes it needs to be there otherwise the case will shift over time and give you more problems.
• Put new timing case onto the engine and torque.
• Lube up the camshaft with a heavy weight engine assembly oil
• Carefully put camshaft back into the engine and put camshaft retainer plate back on.
• Bolt lift pump back to the block, replacing the bolts with studs and nuts will make the job a lot easier.
• Remove the 12” dowel rods a good pull will make the dowels come out
• Replace push rods and rocker assemblies, torque the 8 mm bolt to 18 ft/lbs, the 12 mm bolt has three steps: 66ft/lbs then 89 ft/lbs then turn the bolt an additional 90*
• Set valve lash (.010” intake, .020” exhaust)
• Place valve covers back on
• Reassemble windshield wipers and cowl
• Bolt injection pump back on
• Clean IP shaft with carb/brake cleaner very well and dry with a lint free rag
• Install gear, washer and nut then torque nut to 120 ft/lbs
• Re-bolt power vacuum/PS pump. Torque to 57 ft/lbs
• Replace your front main seal
• Put timing cover back on with gasket or silicone in place
• Replace harmonic balancer, torque to 92 ft/lbs, and the RPM sensor
• Put you radiator and intercooler back (the intercooler before the radiator) and don’t forget about the bracket that goes in between the two
• Reattach intercooler boots/pipes
• Re attach lower radiator hose
• Move the A/C condenser back and reattach
• Now reattach your fan assembly and fan shroud (at the same time, it won’t work any other way)
• Replace the accessory drive belt
• Put front cross piece back on
• Reattach the windshield wiper fluid reservoir to the fan shroud
• Reinstall upper radiator hose
• Check to see that you don’t have any extra parts and if everything is connected
• Fill up the coolant and hope for the best
• An oil change is a good idea after this procedure incase anything got into the engine during work

After finishing run the engine for a few minutes so any dust or dirt that got into the engine during work gets loose then do an oil change.
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Old 12-11-2009, 01:14 PM   #2 (permalink)
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The process above with pictures> CumminsDatabase.com :: 12V Dowel Pin Repair

If you want to make it easier

Most Cummins shops no longer remove the cam when replacing the case, cuts about $600 off the bill. By not removing the cam you don't have to take the front end all apart, remove valve covers or fool around with wooden dowels.

After the timing case cover is off turn the engine till the line up marks on the gears are lined up. A high quality three prong puller (Snap On is best) is used to remove the gear off the cam but there is also a special Cummins puller made just for it that works way better. The gear goes back on by heating it and sliding it on to the cam.

The gear can be heated in two ways, 1) Toaster oven, next to the truck so the gear does not cool down: 2) Propane space heater, one that can have the elements turn up like a grill. Set the temp around 300 F. The oven is the easiest way, depending on the oven it could take 30-45 minutes to heat up, in the meantime you can clean some parts. The propane heater is faster about 10-15 minutes.

You need an extra hand for a few minutes to hold the cam from moving back and pushing out the rear cam plug. The cam is held by removing the fuel lift/transfer pump (don't drop the pump actuator arm into the crankcase!) and using a pry bar on the cam lobe, apply a little force to move the cam toward the front of the engine. The cam can move slightly but all you want is the cam not to move back when the gear is going back on. Once the gear is up to the temp, the crank and cam timing position has been set, someone is holding the cam from sliding back, you then grab the gear with high temp welding gloves and slide the gear back on, sometimes might have to tap it back with a plastic mallet or dead blow hammer but never with a steel hammer. I've done this three times and never had to use a hammer, the gear slid right on.

I would only recommend this to someone with mechanical experience. Sounds a little complicated but is way easier. There are three draw backs: 1) gear cooling down half way, then you have to wait 10 minutes to cool and remove it again to start all over; 2) Not aligning the crank and cam; 3) Allowing the cam to move back and pushing out the rear cam plug, then you will have to pull the engine.

Some people think this method causes a weaker fit for the gear but Cummins has been using this method exclusively for several years, I've never heard of a problem
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Last edited by illflem; 12-15-2009 at 08:36 PM.
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Old 11-23-2010, 07:42 PM   #3 (permalink)
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More case repair pictures> Livingston's 97 Dodge Ram 3500 CTD Build Thread
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Old 11-06-2012, 01:12 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Cheap timing gear case> Cummins 5.9L 12 Valve (1994-1998) Timing Gear Housing Cover - Interchanges 3936256
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