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Go Back   Dodge Cummins Diesel Forum > 07.5 - 09 6.7 Liter Cummins > 07.5 - 09 3rd Gen 6.7 Liter General Discussion
07.5 - 09 3rd Gen 6.7 Liter General Discussion General Chit Chat About the 6.7L 3rd generation Cummins - NO ADVERTISING

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Old 01-02-2012, 11:42 AM   #37 (permalink)
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Here's the page from the supplement.....
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Is turbo cool down necessary on a 6.7?-page-37-diesel-supplement.jpg  
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Old 01-02-2012, 11:55 AM   #38 (permalink)
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As Paul Harvey would say page 2. I guess I need to contact the Dodge dealer and get the supplement page.
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Old 01-02-2012, 12:14 PM   #39 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ddgthefatherramthedaughtr View Post
Invest in a turbo timer? It does it all for you?? And is pretty much impossible to steal because of the safety features. Step on the brake pedal to get the gear lock off the truck shuts off, take off the ebrake truck shuts off don't turn the key to the on position in x seconds/minutes to turn the vehicle back on the vehicle will shut off.

Set it, get out lock the truck and forget about it.


I use the turbo timer on my Edge. I have it set to run until the EGTs are below 400 F. It rarely runs unless I was in regen or was running loaded and then not for long. But if I had my EGR plugged in then it can run for several minutes even if just easy driving through the neighborhood.
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Old 01-02-2012, 12:19 PM   #40 (permalink)
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Well I looked through the owners manual again and there is nothing in the manual that address's stopping the motor and cooling off the turbo. My truck does not have a exhaust gas temperature gauge or read out. Is that a add on?
Your truck didn't come with an (exhaust gas temp gauge) because it doesn't need one. Your turbo just isn't that fragile. That said, all engines should get some cool down time before shutdown, after a hard workout, turbo or not, gas or diesel. Many truck tractors come equipped with pyrometers. Steep uphill pulls will raise EGT's quickly and by watching the gauge, the driver knows when to back out of the throttle and downshift. Most experienced truck drivers don't need a gauge to tell them when their engine is working hard.
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Old 01-02-2012, 02:46 PM   #41 (permalink)
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Most experienced truck drivers don't need a gauge to tell them when their engine is working hard.
You're right, they need it to diagnose other potentially catastrophic engine problems. A positive side effect is always knowing what temp your EGTs are even when no problem exists.
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Old 01-03-2012, 10:45 AM   #42 (permalink)
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Help me understand. If the turbo stops circulating oil and coolant, these fluids will immediately absorb the turbo's heat. It can't be good for oil and coolant to boil or heat to extremes. I always let my EGT cool to 250*. It takes up to 10 minutes, but I do it anyway. I use a ScanGuageII, so the turbo is probably hotter than where I'm reading, but it's a good indicator. My turbo was replace at 60,000 miles, so somebody before me wasn't treating it right and I refuse to subject it and (more so) my fluids to this type of heat. Hot kills everything about an internal combustion engine. Never ever let an engine or trans over heat. Things warp, they coke, they burn, etc..... It's no wonder we need to change our coolant diligently - we're burning the out of it.

Come on experts, tell us what kind of temperature oil and coolant can handle before breaking down. Any Chemical Engineers out there?
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Old 01-03-2012, 11:31 AM   #43 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by eyeman05 View Post
Help me understand. If the turbo stops circulating oil and coolant, these fluids will immediately absorb the turbo's heat. It can't be good for oil and coolant to boil or heat to extremes. I always let my EGT cool to 250*. It takes up to 10 minutes, but I do it anyway. I use a ScanGuageII, so the turbo is probably hotter than where I'm reading, but it's a good indicator. My turbo was replace at 60,000 miles, so somebody before me wasn't treating it right and I refuse to subject it and (more so) my fluids to this type of heat. Hot kills everything about an internal combustion engine. Never ever let an engine or trans over heat. Things warp, they coke, they burn, etc..... It's no wonder we need to change our coolant diligently - we're burning the out of it.

Come on experts, tell us what kind of temperature oil and coolant can handle before breaking down. Any Chemical Engineers out there?
coking of oils starts around the 400-450F mark, typical engine coolant will boil around 240F, so the theory is that by idling down your allowing the oils (and coolant) to asorb the the heat from the engine.


bear in mind that the engine will cool down once the engine is at idle in the cold,(well i would make such an assumption who knows with the CR's that can control their exhaust temps.
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Old 01-03-2012, 12:16 PM   #44 (permalink)
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From the Cummins site:

Good engine operating procedures are essential to prolong turbocharger life.

Most frequent operating problems

Particular attention to oil system and air system faults will eliminate the two main causes of turbocharger failure. To prevent this Operators/Owners must ensure that :-



1) Air and oil filters are checked regularly to the manufacturer's specifications


2) Engine maintenance intervals are adhered to.


3) Engine and equipment are operated in such a way that is not harmful to the life of the turbocharger.




Good operating practices

Operators and owners can help themselves to get maximum service life from their turbochargers if a few good practices are followed:-
Start Up
When starting the engine use minimum throttle and run in idle mode for approximately one minute. Full working oil pressure builds up within seconds but it is useful to allow the turbocharger moving parts to warm up under good lubricating conditions. Revving the engine within the first few seconds of start up causes the turbocharger to rotate at high speeds with marginal lubrication which can lead to early failure of the turbocharger.
After Servicing
After servicing the engine or turbocharger ensure that the turbocharger is pre-lubed by adding clean engine oil into the turbocharger oil inlet until full. After pre-lubing crank the engine without firing (engine/fuel pump stop out) to allow oil to circulate through the full system under pressure. On starting the engine, run at idle for a few minutes to ensure the oil and bearing systems are operating satisfactorily.
Low Air Temperatures & Inactive Operation
If the engine has been inactive for some time or the air temperature is very low, crank the engine first and then run at idle. This allows the oil to circulate throughout the full system before high loads and speeds are applied to engine and turbocharger.
Shut Down
Before shutting your engine down, let the turbocharger cool down. When an engine runs at maximum power/high torque, the turbocharger is operating at very high temperatures and speeds. Hot shut down can cause reduced service life which is avoidable by a minute or two of idling. Most mobile equipment applications include an adequate cooling period during parking or mooring procedures.
See hot shutdown graph.



Allow your engine to idle for 1-5 minutes to allow the high temperatures and speed to reduce and so prolong the life of your turbocharger.
Engine Idle
Avoid running your engine for long periods in idle mode (greater than 20-30 minutes). Under idling conditions low pressures are generated in the turbocharger which can cause oil mist to leak past seals into the two end housings. Although no real harm is done to the turbocharger, as load is applied temperatures increase and the oil will start to burn off and cause blue smoke emission problems.
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